Crusty Gluten-Free Artisan Bread

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Holding a slice of gluten-free artisan bread next to more slices

Hold the phone. We’ve dreamed of this bread all of our gluten-free days and it has finally arrived. Introducing the most fluffy, chewy, perfectly textured, crusty, artisan-style gluten-free bread you could ever imagine. We’re in LOVE! Simple flours, minimal active prep, truly life-changing.

All that stands between you and this vegan + gluten-free loaf are 7 ingredients and a little bit of time. It’s the perfect weekend activity, and there’s nothing better than starting the work week with a fresh loaf of bread! Let’s bake!

Cane sugar, sea salt, potato starch, tapioca flour, yeast, brown rice flour, psyllium husk powder, and warm water

How to Make Artisan-Style Gluten-Free Bread

This gluten-free artisan-style bread begins like a traditional bread recipe: with activating the yeast in warm sugar water, giving it a classic taste and beautiful rise.

Pouring psyllium husk powder into a bowl of activated yeast water

After that, things get a little different! To mimic the chewy, flexible, sticky texture of gluten, this loaf relies on a special ingredient that’s well worth adding to your gluten-free pantry: psyllium husk powder!

Psyllium is KEY to the undetectably gluten-free texture of this bread, and there’s just nothing quite like it. Bonus? It’s a fiber-rich ingredient with some pretty impressive digestive health benefits.

Stirring a psyllium gel mixture into gluten-free flours

Now that we’ve gotten that essential ingredient out of the way, let’s talk about our trio of gluten-free flours, which is also important for the right texture!

Brown rice flour is the primary ingredient, giving the bread structure and a wholesome, neutral flavor. The other two are potato starch to keep it light and fluffy and tapioca flour to give the dough a little stretch. The final ingredient is salt for flavor!

Holding the sides of shaped dough

After adding the flours, you’ll be jumping into a little finger workout (unless you have a mixer with a dough hook). Vigorously kneading the dough helps to hydrate the flours and evenly distribute the psyllium, ensuring the best texture.

Then we shape it, let it rise, and it’s time to bake. Our preferred method is in a Dutch oven because it easily captures steam, making the outside of the bread shiny, stretchy and pliable. But if you only have a baking sheet or loaf pan, we think you’ll still be impressed with the result!

Gluten-free bread in a Dutch oven with parchment paper around it before baking

Check out that bubbly beauty!

Flaky salt and butter next to a partially sliced loaf of crusty gluten-free artisan bread

We can’t wait for you to try this bread! It’s:

Chewy
Fluffy
Beautiful
Crusty on the outside
Soft on the inside
& SO delicious!

It reminds us of bread that’s often served as a starter at fancy restaurants with soft, spreadable butter or an herby olive oil + balsamic dipping sauce.

But the serving options know no limits! Enjoy it with nut butter, alongside soups, and for making bruschetta, grilled “cheese” sandwiches, and more.

More Gluten-Free Bread Recipes

If you try this recipe, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it, and don’t forget to tag a photo @minimalistbaker on Instagram. Cheers, friends!

Holding a slice of gluten-free bread just dipped into an olive oil and balsamic vinegar dipping sauce

Crusty Gluten-Free Artisan Bread

A FLUFFY, crusty, artisan-style gluten-free bread recipe that’s vegan and EASY to make. Just 7 ingredients required for this beautiful loaf!
Author Minimalist Baker
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Holding up a slice of gluten-free artisan-style bread with more slices behind it
5 from 16 votes
Prep Time 55 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Total Time 2 hours
Servings 8 (Slices)
Course Bread
Cuisine Gluten-Free, Nut-Free, Oil-Free, Vegan
Freezer Friendly 1 month
Does it keep? 2-3 Days

Ingredients

  • 1 ⅓ cup warm water
  • 2 Tbsp cane sugar (or sub maple syrup)
  • 2 ¼ tsp active dry yeast (1 packet yields 2 ¼ tsp or 7 g)
  • 1 ½ Tbsp psyllium husk powder* (not whole // we like Anthony’s Goods)
  • 1 cup brown rice flour
  • 3/4 cup potato starch (NOT potato flour)
  • 1/2 cup tapioca flour (also called tapioca starch)
  • 1 tsp sea salt

Instructions

INSTRUCTIONS FOR A DUTCH OVEN OR LOAF PAN

  • Dust a proofing basket with brown rice flour -OR- lightly coat a small mixing bowl with water (so the flour sticks) and then dust with flour. Set aside. If using a loaf pan, just oil the loaf pan and dust it with brown rice flour. See notes for additional instructions for using a loaf pan.
  • In a small mixing bowl or liquid measuring cup, whisk together the warm water (100-110 degrees F / 38-43 C) and sugar until the sugar is dissolved. Whisk in the yeast and let it bloom on the counter for about 10-15 minutes until frothy. If it doesn’t foam, start over — your water may have been too hot or the yeast was expired.
  • Once the yeast has bloomed, whisk in the psyllium husk powder and let the mixture gel for about 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, to a medium mixing bowl, add brown rice flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, and salt. Whisk well to combine. Once the yeast mixture has rested, add it to the dry ingredients. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to mix thoroughly. The dough should look shaggy to start. Once it becomes difficult to stir, use your hands to vigorously knead into a cohesive yet still very sticky ball. It should take at least 3 minutes* to fully break the flour down into the liquid. Feel free to squeeze the dough between your fingers to fully incorporate it (our preferred method). Your hands will get sticky and be covered with dough — this is normal and encouraged!
  • Scrape the excess dough from your hands and place it back into the bowl. Wash and dry your hands well. The dough should be tacky but combined enough that you are able to handle it. If it’s still too sticky, spend additional time kneading the dough together.
  • Turn the dough out onto your work surface. You shouldn’t need flour to shape it, but if you do, use very little! Use your hands to shape the dough into a ball and place it into your prepared proofing basket, flour-dusted bowl, or flour-dusted loaf pan. If you find your hands are sticking to the dough, feel free to moisten them slightly with water. If using a loaf pan, spread the dough so it's close to the corners of the pan – it will spread further as it rises. Cover your dough ball with a towel and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes until it has almost doubled in size.
  • After the 30 minutes is up, place a Dutch oven (with the lid on) into the oven and preheat it to 450 degrees F (232 C). If using a loaf pan, reference the timing in the notes section instead of the next two instructions.
  • Once the oven is preheated and your Dutch oven is hot, place a piece of parchment paper onto your work surface and gently flip the dough out onto it, using your hand at the bottom of the dough to guide it. Use oven mitts to carefully remove your Dutch oven from the oven, place it onto a heatproof surface, and take the lid off of it. Lift the edges of the parchment paper to place your dough (and the parchment paper) into the Dutch oven. Place 3-4 ice cubes on the outside of the parchment paper so they are not touching the dough. Put your oven mitts back on and place the lid back onto the Dutch oven. Place the Dutch oven back into the oven on the center rack and bake for 35 minutes.
  • Once the 35 minutes have passed, lower the oven temperature to 425 degrees F (218 C) and put your oven mitts back on to carefully remove the lid from the Dutch oven and place it onto a heatproof surface. Close your oven and bake for another 30-35 minutes without the lid. The crust should be dark and the bread should sound hollow when you tap it with a spoon or knife.
  • Once baked, use oven mitts to remove the Dutch oven from the oven. Use the parchment to carefully lift the bread from the pan and place on a cooling rack to fully cool (~2-3 hours). You want the bread to be fully cooled before cutting to avoid a gummy texture. Store the bread in a bread wrap or bag at room temperature for up to 2-3 days, though best within the first 24 hours. You can also store the bread in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or freeze sliced bread for 1 month (or longer). After refrigerating/freezing, toast the bread before enjoying!

INSTRUCTIONS FOR A BAKING SHEET

  • Dust a proofing basket with brown rice flour -OR- lightly coat a small mixing bowl with water (so the flour sticks) and then dust with flour. Set aside.
  • In a small mixing bowl or liquid measuring cup, whisk together the warm water (100-110 degrees F / 38-43 C) and sugar until the sugar is dissolved. Whisk in the yeast and let it bloom on the counter for about 10-15 minutes until frothy. If it doesn’t foam, start over — your water may have been too hot or the yeast was expired.
  • Once the yeast has bloomed, whisk in the psyllium husk powder and let the mixture gel for about 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, to a medium mixing bowl, add brown rice flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, and salt. Whisk well to combine. Once the yeast mixture has rested, add it to the dry ingredients. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to mix thoroughly. The dough should look shaggy to start. Once it becomes difficult to stir, use your hands to vigorously knead into a cohesive yet still very sticky ball. It should take at least 3 minutes* to fully break the flour down into the liquid. Feel free to squeeze the dough between your fingers to fully incorporate it (our preferred method). Your hands will get sticky and be covered with dough — this is normal and encouraged!
  • Scrape the excess dough from your hands and place it back into the bowl. Wash and dry your hands well. The dough should be tacky but combined enough that you are able to handle it. If it’s still too sticky, spend additional time kneading the dough together.
  • Turn the dough out onto your work surface. You shouldn’t need flour to shape it, but if you do, use very little! Use your hands to shape the dough into a ball and place it into your prepared proofing basket or flour-dusted bowl. If you find your hands are sticking to the dough, feel free to moisten them slightly with water. Cover your dough ball with a towel and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes until it has almost doubled in size.
  • After the 30 minutes is up, boil 1 cup (240 ml) of water. Preheat your oven to 450 degrees F (232 C), place an oven rack in the middle of your oven and a rack below that one, find two baking sheets, and set aside.
  • Once the oven is preheated, place one of the baking sheets on the lower oven rack and carefully fill with the boiling water. Gently flip the dough out onto the other baking sheet, using your hand at the bottom of the dough to guide it. Place the baking sheet with the dough into the oven on the higher baking rack and bake at 450 degrees F (232 C) for 30 minutes. Lower the temp to 425 degrees F (218 C) and bake for another 25-30 minutes. The crust should be dark and the bread should sound hollow when you tap it with a spoon or knife.
  • Once baked, use oven mitts to remove the pan from the oven then carefully lift the bread from the pan and place on a cooling rack to fully cool (~2-3 hours). You want the bread to be fully cooled before cutting to avoid a gummy texture. Store the bread in a bread wrap or bag at room temperature for up to 2-3 days, though best within the first 24 hours. You can also store the bread in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or freeze sliced bread for 1 month (or longer). After refrigerating/freezing, toast the bread before enjoying!

Video

Notes

*Loaf pan instructions: If you don’t have a Dutch oven, you can bake the bread in a standard-size metal loaf pan — simply proof the bread in the loaf pan you plan on baking it in instead of a bowl or proofing basket. Bake at 450 F (232 C) for 25 minutes, then lower the oven temperature to 425 F (218 C) and bake for another 25 minutes. You can skip the ice cubes/pan of water if baking in a loaf pan.
*If you have a stand mixer with a dough hook, you can use that to mix in step 4.
*If you want to prepare the dough the night before baking, skip the rise at room temperature and put the dough directly in the fridge (covered) after shaping. When ready to bake, let rise on top of the oven (or in a warm spot) for 20-30 minutes while the oven preheats. Then bake as instructed.
*Psyllium husk powder is an essential ingredient in this recipe and we don’t recommend substituting anything else. If you have whole psyllium husk (not powder), you might be able to grind it in a spice grinder and add more of it until the texture resembles the photos, but we can’t guarantee the result.
*Psyllium SEED powder and psyllium HUSK powder are not the same thing. You’ll need psyllium HUSK powder for this recipe.
*Herby oil + vinegar dipping sauce: Mix equal parts high-quality extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar with a pinch each of flaky sea salt, crushed red pepper flakes, and dried oregano or Italian herb blend; add more of any component to taste.
*Nutrition information is a rough estimate calculated without optional ingredients.

Nutrition (1 of 8 servings)

Serving: 1 slice Calories: 166 Carbohydrates: 38.4 g Protein: 2 g Fat: 0.8 g Saturated Fat: 0.3 g Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.2 g Monounsaturated Fat: 0.3 g Trans Fat: 0 g Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 297 mg Potassium: 74 mg Fiber: 2.8 g Sugar: 3.4 g Vitamin A: 0 IU Vitamin C: 0 mg Calcium: 9 mg Iron: 0.5 mg

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  1. Nancy says

    I have made many GF breads, but this is the recipe I’ve been looking for! Whoever came up with the psyllium husk powder idea is a genius! I used a mixer with a dough hook, a brotform and an Emile Henry ceramic bread pot for baking, omitting the ice. It didn’t take as long to bake, but had a great crust and nice interior. (Mine wasn’t as “holey” as your photos, but I used instant yeast, so next time I’ll try active.) I slashed the top to allow more oven spring. It came out great. THANKS!

  2. Cheryl says

    This is the most amazingly flavorful, wonderfully textured bread on the planet, GF or not!!! After 8 years medically GF, I had basically given up on ever enjoying bread again, but to this gorgeous loaf I am completely addicted, and so is my non-GF husband! I cannot wait to share it with our Celiac daughter when she next visits!

    Tips and modifications: I cut the sugar (maple syrup) in half, then INCREASED everything else by half (sliced and froze leftovers the same day so always fresh). I kept oven temps the same, used the Dutch oven method, determining the bread done when the internal temp reached 205 degrees F. I used a stand mixer, combining ingredients on the lowest speed, then bumping up to #2 speed for 3 minutes. The dough was too wet to shape so I transferred directly into a proofing bowl, then covered it with a dish towel, putting it into a cold oven, placing a 9” x 13” baking dish on the bottom shelf then filling it with boiling water (remember to remove it from the oven before preheating for the baking step!). Closed in my steaming DIY proofing drawer, dough was perfectly risen in 30 minutes. My only issue was mustering the patience not to cut into the loaf before cooled, but well worth the wait! It was perfect in every way (my third loaf is now cooling on the counter). Thank you again for the gift of being able to enjoy once again the satisfaction and pleasure of eating utterly delicious bread!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Aw, this makes us SO happy, Cheryl! This was definitely our goal in creating this recipe :) Thank you so much for sharing your experience! xoxo

  3. Monica says

    One MILLON stars!! This GF bread is life changing! I followed the baking sheet recipe and it came out absolutely perfect. I can’t stop eating it! The crust is seriously addicting and reminds me of wheat-based french crusty bread and the inside is springy and moist – definitely NOT like any other low fat GF bread I’ve bought or made. Which is a good thing! Thank you so much for this recipe and all the baking variations! I am on a low fat, GF, WFPB diet for medical reasons and I have been missing bread and butter so much. This bread with a small bit of vegan oil free aioli is perfection!

  4. JJ says

    I am relatively new to gluten free baking. Most things I have made have not been a success. This bread was 10 out of 10! I recipe exactly as written and it turned out perfect. Great with a bowl of soup and made excellent toast in the morning the next day. Thank you!

  5. Samantha Hedges says

    The bread was really good, but the inside was sticky, overall the texture was off. We used the Dutch oven method and waited for the loaf to cool completely before cutting. Any suggestions?

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Samantha, sorry to hear the texture wasn’t right! Did you make any modifications to the flours?

      • Samantha Hedges says

        No, we followed the recipe exactly. My partners lovessss it so we are definitely fans. Just curious if you had any recommendations. Thanks.

        • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

          It sounds like it was too wet for some reason! That would happen if the ratio of liquid to absorbent ingredients was too high. You could possibly try less water or a different brand of psyllium husk powder. Keep us posted if you give it another try!

  6. Allie says

    I made this bread and believe I followed the recipe correctly. However the bread turned out rock hard and like a brick. Any idea where I went wrong?

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Oh no! Sorry that happened, Allie. Our best guess is the yeast didn’t activate and rise properly! Is it possible it was old/expired or the water was too hot/cold?

  7. Brigitta says

    I made this recipe, and I can say, being gluten intolerant for many many years, this is one of the best breads that I have ever made. Although it came out kinda flat, but I think its was the problem of my proofing basket being to wide.. But the texture, especially toasted is a dream! I will definitely making it again :) Thank you

  8. Vickie says

    This bread came out great!
    The last time I made bread, it was a brick but this is delicious.
    I think my psyllium powder must be seed not husk. As another comment said, my dough was very wet, not shapeable, so I just poured into loaf pan and baked according to the instructions. This is better than any gluten free bread I’ve found in the store. The taste is good, the texture is good.
    I am so pleased!

  9. Kristin says

    Made this for my GF friend & followed fantastic instructions exactly. We both loved the bread, but she was ESPECIALLY delighted bc she never has bread (GF bread is usually not wonderful). 2 days and we’ve housed almost half the loaf!

    Only dilemma: didn’t rise much–the loaf was only about 1.5″ high when baked (Dutch oven). Yeast proved very well in warm water, ground my own psyllium flour in a grain mill from husks… My theories: water was too warm when proving yeast & it spent itself too early OR without gluten the loaf needs the support of a loaf pan to really rise (like a quick bread?). Going to try again & experiment, but I’d love your thoughts!

    Even w no rise, this bread is FABULOUS!! Thank you for another great recipe!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      We’re so glad it was still amazing! Thank you for sharing, Kristin! It sounds like it was maybe too wet, causing the loaf to spread and be shorter in height? It’s possible you needed more psyllium to absorb the moisture since homemade isn’t usually as finely ground as store-bought. Hope that helps for next time!

  10. Mindy Galamaga says

    I made this tonight and followed the impeccable instructions! It was my first bread I ever made and it was perfect, lol haven’t been this proud since I gave birth ! I made it in a Dutch oven that was oversized to the bread and it worked wonderfully to make a pretty round loaf that looked and tasted better than any bread ever and I can’t wait to make as gifts for the holidays. I rarely make recipes from an online source, sticking to cook books. I will definitely keep exploring but stay true to my minamalist baker cook book ! So grateful to eat healthy bread that everyone loves !

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Aw, YAY! We’re so happy the instructions were helpful and that you had success! We’re honored you love it so much. Thank you for sharing, Mindy! xoxo

  11. Mark Landow says

    Made the bread, and the results are light and tasty with a great crust.
    I followed the recipe exactly with the ingredients as specified. Only difference was my psyllium husk powder was purchased bulk from my local health food store. Yeast foamed and psyllium gelled nicely.
    When I mixed everything the dough was very wet, despite mix/kneeling for 6 minutes. There was no additional flour to integrate. Too wet in my opinion. I wound up kneading additional flour into the dough so it would allow it to be handled. It wouldn’t stay in a ball shape due to its wet internal composition.
    Next time I will use the metric values so I can weight the flour rather than volume measurements. Any thoughts on the wetness ?

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Mark, thanks so much for sharing your experience! Is it possible you were using psyllium seed powder instead of psyllium husk powder? We once bought psyllium seed powder and had a similar experience to what you’re describing. Another cause could be if using whole psyllium husks instead of powdered.

      • Mark Landow says

        I confirmed I was using psyllium husk powder.

        I used the metric weights listed in the recipe and noted the following:
        1 cup brown rice flour = 134 grams
        1 cup & 3 1/3 tablespoons brf = 160 grams
        3/4 cup potato starch = 119 grams
        1/2 cup tapioca starch = 55 grams

        Your recipe in metric calls for 160g, 120g, and 60g for each flour type.

        • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

          Hi Mark, thanks for this info! It’s normal for there to be a little variation and for it to vary based on the method used to measure (scoop and level vs. pour and level) as well as the brand of flour. If you weigh them out a few times, you’ll get a different result each time :)

  12. Liz says

    Once again Minimalist Baker directions were impeccable. Added caraway seeds. I have made this three times now and it is just perfect every time. So EASY!!!!!!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Aw, YAY! We’re so happy to hear it, Liz. Thank you for the lovely review! And caraway seeds sound amazing – YUM! xoxo

  13. Jill says

    I made this yesterday, and the flavor was amazing, but the texture was very dense. I used my mixer to kneed it and wonder if that’s what happened? I followed the instructions to a t other than the mixer.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Oh no! Sorry that happened, Jill. We wouldn’t think a mixer would be an issue. Did your yeast activate? Did the bread rise/double in size?

  14. Kelsey says

    Question 1: Made this today! Love the recipe but our loaf had a huge hole. Looking for suggestions to try this again but avoid the hold in the middle. Tastes great, but didn’t love the hole.

    Question 2: is there any way to make this loaf taller? If I did 1½ times the original recipe could that work? Look for the loaf to get a little taller.

    Used the metric and followed recipe exactly by weight. Used a loaf pan and those specific instructions. They bread did double in size before I baked it – we let it cool for 3 hours before cutting.

    THANK YOU

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Kelsey, Thanks so much for sharing your experience! It could be that the yeast created an air pocket in the middle while kneading/bringing it together – yeast is funny! It probably won’t have a hole the second time around, but really make sure everything is incorporated VERY well! We do think you could do 1 1/2 times the recipe for a taller loaf. You may need to bake slightly longer at the lower temp. Keep us posted!

  15. Nina says

    I totally messed up the recipe and it still turned out really good!! 😂 I forgot to add the psyllium husks to the yeast mix, so when I combined the wet and dry it became a loose batter. I quickly added the psyllium and it did thicken up, but it wasn’t going to be firm enough to shape into a ball. So I put it in a loaf pan instead and baked according to the loaf pan instructions. The crust came out a bit tough but the inside was soft and the taste was yummy! My 4-year old loved it and ate it plain saying it didn’t need anything on it. Next time, I’m excited to do it right 😂

  16. Louise Gagne says

    What an amazingly recipe. Thank you from the bottom of my heart!
    So good, my husband ate 2 big pieces for dinner last night, and he’s not even gluten free! He can’t wait for me to make more, so I’m in search for buns, English muffin, and other bread recipes. I’ve bookmarked your site to do a deep dive into your GF recipe files 😁

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Aw, YAY! We’re so happy you both enjoyed the bread, Louise. Thank you for the lovely review! We have recipes for buns and English muffins :)

  17. Pia says

    I only have corn starch at home at the moment. Is it very essential to have tapioca (I can only find starch, not flour) AND potato starch? Thanks, love your recipes!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Pia, tapioca starch and tapioca flour are the same thing! Tapioca starch gives it a stretchy quality, while potato starch is more drying and makes it light and fluffy. Corn starch is also drying vs. stretchy. The next best sub for tapioca would probably be arrowroot starch, but we haven’t tested it that way. We’d definitely recommend tapioca starch for the best loaf!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Arla, Tapioca starch helps give it a stretchy quality. Arrowroot starch might work, but we haven’t tested it and can’t guarantee it will turn out the same. Let us know if you try it!

  18. Michelle says

    I have tried dozens of gluten-free bread recipes. This by far is the absolute best. I double the recipe and used loaf pans. Next time I will try a Dutch oven. The measurements were perfect. The bread was crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside. Absolutely amazing taste!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Carrie, we wouldn’t recommend almond in this one. You could possibly try a combination of other whole grain gluten-free flours, but keep in mind it won’t turn out quite the same. Possibly a combination of oat, sorghum, teff, millet, and/or quinoa flours?

  19. Lauren says

    SO GOOD! I didn’t have psyllium husk powder nor potato starch but decided to go for it anyway. I used cornstarch instead of potato (subbed and equal amount), and whole psyllium husks instead of ground (3tbsp whole psyllium husk instead of the 1.5tbsp ground). I blended all the dry ingredients in my high-speed blender in hopes of powdering the psyllium a bit. It only needed to rise for about 45 minutes, and I did score it a bit before baking. I make gluten free bread all the time (I’ve made three artisan loaves this week) and have been trying to find a winning artisan loaf — this one is my fave so far!!!

  20. ML bader says

    Do you have the weight measurements for the flours, etc.? I find my baked goods turn out better following a recipe where ingredients are listed by weight rather than volume.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Yes! You can find the weight measurements by clicking “metric” beneath the ingredients header. Hope that helps!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Vicki, we don’t think it will turn out as light and fluffy because it’s not enough potato starch.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Yes! We’ve done it in as small as a 2.5 qt. It’s a tight squeeze to fit the ice cubes, but it works!

  21. The Vegan Goddess says

    Ooh, this looks wonderful and doesn’t require too much yeast which I try to avoid. Do you think that lemon juice might work as a sub for yeast?

      • The Vegan Goddess says

        Maybe baking powder would be a good sub for the yeast.

        Not sure if it would be an equal amount or less than the yeast. Usually there isn’t a need for too much baking powder in recipes, so I presume less could do the trick.

  22. Arze says

    Hello
    Looks amazing , why it has to be powder ?
    And if i want to make them yeast free or using sourdough starter how much do i need ?

    Thank you 🙏🏻

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Arze, the powder absorbs the liquid a lot better than whole husks. We aren’t sure on the sourdough starter!

      • Cat Fergusson says

        This sounds delicious, and i have psyllium husk, I’ll whizz it up into powder. Could you use a breadmaking machine?

        • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

          Hi Cat, we tested making it into a fine powder using a spice grinder and it wasn’t quite as absorbent as the store-bought powder, so keep in mind you may need extra! We haven’t used a breadmaking machine so we’re not sure, but this recipe really benefits from kneading vigorously to incorporate the flours with the psyllium (not sure how well a bread machine does that!). Let us know how it goes!